David Hockney

Going up Garrowby Hill

Tate Britain
9th February – 29th May 2017

Helen and I set off for a day in London combining a meet up with friends for lunch and finishing up at Tate Britain for the new David Hockney: 60 Years of Work.

Well we didn’t arrive at the Tate until 4 o’clock timed entry 3.30 pm but hoped we would get to see everything.

From the start I had forgotten how large his work was from his early 1960’s and 70’s his time at the Royal College of Art and on to his life in Los Angeles. 12 galleries filled wall to wall with wonderful expressive modern and contemporary works of art over 60 years.

Ossie Wearing a Fairisle Sweater

We had missed his recent portrait exhibition but the most famous are here. ‘Ossie Wearing a Fairisle Sweater’ to ‘Pool with Two Figures and Mr & Mrs Clark and Percy’ and others.

Pen and Ink sketches from the late 1960’s and 70’s of his friends: “a few lines express the character of the sitter; one or two items conjure the feeling of place or a moment in time.”

Pearblossom Highway

His latest work in Yorkshire and Hollywood photographic collages ‘Pearblossom Highway’ 1986 to his wooded scenes of Woldgate and running videos of ‘The Four Seasons’ showing Woldgate Woods during the turning of the seasons.

So much that we were almost the last to leave at 6 o’clock.

Quite an exhausting day but home by 9.30 and full of wonderful images, well worth a visit even if you are not a Hockney fan.

“This exhibition gathers together an extensive selection of David Hockney’s most famous works celebrating his achievements in painting, drawing, print, photography and video across six decades.

‘The Four Seasons’ — Woldgate Woods

As he approaches his 80th birthday, Hockney continues to change his style and ways of working, embracing new technologies as he goes. From his portraits and images of Los Angeles swimming pools, through to his drawings and photography, Yorkshire landscapes and most recent paintings – some of which have never been seen before in public – this exhibition shows how the roots of each new direction lay in the work that came before. A once-in-a-lifetime chance to see these unforgettable works together.”
Helen Walker